County Living

HomeCounty Living ( August 17, 2022 )

Foster Grandparents Cushion Summer Slide

Submitted by Michael Taylor, Community Services Coordinator

The start of the school year is just around the corner. Stores are having back to school sales, Fall sports are starting practices and the AmeriCorps-Seniors Foster Grandparent volunteers are getting ready to head back to school.

This year the "Summer Slide", when kids lose significant knowledge in reading and math over summer break, may be greater that in previous years. Remote learning, decreased instruction time, and fewer personalized interactions with teachers may cause widespread learning loss.

Mentoring programs are one of many ways to assist students in recovering from the "Summer Slide". Mentoring has long been a way of assisting students who need extra assistance and provide young people with personal, academic and professional benefits.

The AmeriCorps-Senior Foster Grandparent Program is a volunteer mentoring program that can assist our community's schools and children. Classroom Foster Grandparent volunteers provide love and guidance to children and youth with special and exceptional needs at volunteer stations across Bradford, Sullivan, Susquehanna and Tioga Counties. Classroom Foster Grandparents work one on one and in small groups under the supervision of a classroom teacher.

To become a Classroom Foster Grandparent volunteer one needs to be 55 or older, be income eligible and enjoy working with children. Classroom Foster Grandparents receive a small stipend, clearances, travel and training. Classroom Foster Grandparents can serve from 5 to 40 hours per week.

Classroom Foster Grandparent volunteers receive many benefits. Benefits include a tax free stipend of $3.15 per hour, mileage/transportation, paid training, paid holidays and paid time off, and in-service training.

Prefer to serve older adults? Contact the Senior Companion Program. Senior Companion volunteers serve other seniors in their community by providing assistance and friendship to older adults who have difficulty with daily living tasks.

For more information on the AmeriCorps-Seniors Foster Grandparent Program, Senior Companion Program and other B/S/S/T Area Agency on Aging, Inc. services please call 1-800-982-4346. The B/S/S/T Area Agency on Aging, Inc. is funded in part by the Pennsylvania Department of Aging and the Bradford, Sullivan, Susquehanna, and Tioga County Commissioners.

The AmeriCorps Seniors Foster Grandparent Program and Senior Companion Program is sponsored by the B/S/S/T Area Agency on Aging, Inc. and federally funded by AmeriCorps. Finding also provided by the Bradford County United Way, the Susquehanna County United Way and the Lycoming County United Way-Tioga County.

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Gardener Training Offered in County

Submitted by Kimberly Grace, Master Gardener Co-Coordinator

Would you like to become a Penn State Extension Master Gardener? Enjoy sharing your gardening knowledge? There are still a few openings to join the training, but don't delay…the training begins on Thursday, October 6th! The Penn State Extension Master Gardeners are a fun group of volunteers who support Penn State Cooperative Extension's educational programs in consumer horticulture. They develop their horticultural expertise through participation in an educational training conducted by Penn State University faculty and Penn State Extension staff.

'Master Gardener Basic Training classes' in Susquehanna County begin on Thursday, October 6, 2022, and the in-person meetings will be held weekly (subject to change) at the Penn State Extension Office, 88 Chenango Street in Montrose, PA, until March 2023 (with the exceptions of holidays). Access to computer and internet is strongly advised. We are seeking individuals who want to teach gardening skills and topics to the public. How about strengths in writing, podcasts, technology, presenting, answering hotline garden questions? We have space available for you, so contact us today.

The program provides interested volunteers with extensive training in horticulture and environmental stewardship. In return, newly certified Master Gardeners, volunteer time helping Penn State Extension and its partners educate the community on practical science-based home gardening techniques, through speaking engagements, writing, demonstrations, question and answer service and whatever other talents you think you may bring to the program. We have a spot for you.

The training will be held via Zoom technology with educators across the state. You will have access to each of these sessions to be viewed in the comfort of your home. Each classroom session at the Extension office will consist of fun, hands on activities to enhance newly acquired knowledge, to review questions and more. The cost of the training is $200, which will cover the cost of training materials, an award-winning manual and other expenses.

A few of the topics you will learn: Botany, Plant Propagation, Plant Diseases, Soils, Entomology, Native Plants, IPM, Turfgrass, Vegetables, Plant ID and Diagnostics, Small Fruits, Tree Fruits, Herbaceous & Woody Plants, Pruning, Weeds, Invasive Species, Indoor Plants and other important topics.

Master Gardener trainees are required to participate in a minimum of forty hours of basic training, score 80% on the final exam and fulfill 50 hours of volunteer service to obtain certification. To maintain certification for participation in the program in subsequent years, a Penn State Extension Master Gardener must commit to a minimum of twenty hours of volunteer service each additional year and complete ten hours of approved continuing education each year. Trainees may begin to volunteer as soon as training classes begin with supervision from certified Master Gardeners.

Currently, there are 42 Master Gardeners in Susquehanna County delivering educational programs which include Senior Citizens projects, Poison Prevention programs for first grade students and Harford Fair programming. Master Gardeners also partner with the Montrose Area Adult School to host several programs each year. There are also independent gardening classes, a garden hotline service, and several demonstration gardens. So, come and take part in the training and join this fun, educational group of gardeners!

If you are interested in becoming a Master Gardener in Susquehanna County and want to fill out an application, please contact us at susquehannamg@psu.edu or call the Susquehanna County Master Gardener Hotline at 570-666-9003 for more information. Online application: https://extension.psu.edu/programs/master-gardener/counties/susquehanna/become-a-master-gardener-in-susquehanna-county. Interview schedules will be set up, once you apply. We can accommodate 10 students, so call or email now.

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New Milford Rotary Donates Dictionaries

Submitted by Karen Voigt

New Milford Area Rotary recently presented dictionaries to third grade class students at Mountain View Elementary School. Rotary has been partnering with the Mountain View School District for the past 22 years to provide dictionaries to third graders.

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Milk Is Good For Your Body

Submitted by Kali Harvatine, Susquehanna County Dairy Maid

Hello, my name is Kali Harvatine and I'm a Susquehanna County Dairy Maid. Do you know what whole milk does for your body? Well, one cup of whole milk contains: 30% DV of calcium; 7.9 grams or 16% DV of protein; 24% DV of vitamin D; 18% DV of vitamin B12.

Calcium (a mineral) is a nutrient that assists in sustaining healthy bones and also needed for muscle movement. Protein is important to help every cell in the body. Hair and nails are examples that are mostly made of protein. Your body uses protein to build and repair tissues. You also use protein to make enzymes, hormones and other body chemicals. Vitamin D is a nutrient found in some foods that is needed for health and to maintain strong bones. It does so by helping the body absorb calcium. Vitamin b12 is an important vitamin for brain health for its function in cell metabolism and formation. Vitamin b12 also helps your neurons to create and regenerate the nerve fibers that protect neurons and speed up brain processes. All of those things help your body work properly and they are all quick science facts as to why milk is important in your daily life.

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Mini-Family Reunion Of Tewksbury Family

Submitted by Carol Sullivan

Recently members of the Tewksbury family and friends gathered for a mini-family reunion which included four generations of the Arden Tewksbury family. The four generations are Arden Tewksbury, David Arden Tewksbury, David Arden Tewksbury II, great-grandson, David Arden Tewksbury III and great-granddaughter, Anabelle Tewksbury.

The four generations run from 5 years old to 89 years young.

The gathering also included all the Tewksburys of Tennessee present for this event.

In addition to a regular meal, a plentiful amount of whole chocolate milk was made available to everyone which was quickly consumed courtesy of the local dairy company Camptown dairy of Camptown, Pennsylvania.

Many people realize the early effort that was put forth by the Progressive Agriculture Organization, with manager Arden Tewksbury at the helm, to try to get whole milk, including chocolate milk, back in our schools.

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MV Garden Club Pounds Flowers

Submitted by Sally Roberts

The Mountain View Garden Club held its monthly meeting on July 19, 2022 at 5:30 in the pavilion at the Clifford Township Community Park. The meeting consisted of a potluck dinner and a class on Flower Pounding presented by Louise Venturella, a member of the Susquehanna County Master Gardeners.

Flower pounding is the process of placing a flower on either fine material or card stock and then using a hammer to transfer the image of the flower to the chosen material. As seen in the picture, the result is a very pretty product. The next meeting is scheduled for August 23, 2022 from 11:30am to 3:00pm at Camp Bluestone in Thompson, PA.

If you are interested in becoming a member, please contact Louise Guszick at lmguszick@aol.com and title the message "MVGC Membership Request."

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Contest to Encourage County Students to Reach for the Moon

The Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) is joining forces with the Moonshot Museum, Astrobotic, and the Readiness Institute at Penn State to invite Pennsylvania students in grades 3-12 to participate in a statewide poster contest celebrating America's return to the moon this year, an achievement powered by Pennsylvanians.

"It's only fitting that we announce this new partnership to support and highlight STEAM education on the 53rd anniversary of the first moon landing," said Acting Secretary of Education Eric Hagarty. "This poster contest encourages Pennsylvania students to 'reach for the moon' in their educational and career endeavors, from science to the arts and anything in between."

The Moonshot Poster Contest combines STEM education and the arts in a new way to celebrate the upcoming launch of Astrobotic's Peregrine Lunar Lander. Later this year, Peregrine will be delivering more than two dozen payloads to the lunar surface, including scientific instruments from three national space agencies – including 11 from NASA alone – a rover from Carnegie Mellon University, Hope Moonshot project from Penn State Outreach, several payloads from commercial companies, and cultural messages from individuals around the Earth.

"Moonshot Museum will open this Fall at Pennsylvania's first space museum and the first museum on the planet to focus on career readiness for the 21st century space industry," said Sam Moore, Moonshot Museum executive director. "As we approach the exciting dual milestones of the Museum's opening and Astrobotic's lunar landing later in the year, we can't wait to welcome the artistic contributions of students across Pennsylvania, celebrating the Keystone State's leadership in America's return to the lunar surface."

Students are encouraged to create a poster that reflects one or more of the following aspects of the Peregrine mission:

  • History in the Making: Astrobotic's Peregrine lander will be the first private commercial spacecraft to land on the lunar surface and the first American spacecraft to land on the Moon since the Apollo era.

  • Commercial Space Industry: Peregrine will carry payloads from companies and countries around the world and deploy a small rover to search for underground tunnels or "lava tubes," potential sites for future lunar settlers.

  • Flight of the Falcon: The lunar lander is named for the peregrine falcon, the fastest animal on Earth.

  • Powered by Pennsylvania: Peregrine is being constructed at Astrobotic Headquarters on Pittsburgh's Northside, with metals and electronics built by Pennsylvanians. The spacecraft will launch aboard a rocket from Florida, but once it has left Earth's atmosphere, Astrobotic Mission Control will coordinate the lander's journey to the Moon.

Students can produce their poster submissions independently at home, during classroom time, or during out of school learning programs at community centers, libraries, or summer camps. They may use either computer programs or traditional art supplies to create their poster. Teachers, parents, or guardians should email the student poster submission and completed terms and conditions form to postercontest@moonshotmuseum.org. All submissions must be received by November 30, 2022. For full details on the poster contest and to make a submission, visit https://moonshotmuseum.org/postercontest.

A panel of judges from across the STEAM disciplines in Pennsylvania, including art and science educators and space industry professionals will judge submissions ahead of Astrobotic's launch in late 2022. Winning entries will be selected across three grade ranges: Elementary (Grades 3-4), Middle School (5-8) and High School (9-12).

All submissions will be included, in a digital payload on a future mission to the moon.

For more information about Pennsylvania's education policies and programs, please visit the Department of Education's website. Follow PDE on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, or Pinterest.

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Safe Passage Helping Very Poor Children

Submitted by Jennifer Wilson

Support from the South Gibson-based Dorothea Haus Ross Foundation helps Maine nonprofit, Safe Passage, implement an early educational pilot program in one of the most impoverished areas of Guatemala City. The Guardería, or nursery, opened in June with 20 students and plans to add 20 more in 2023. The goals are to reach children at an earlier age with comprehensive health and family services, to engage young impoverished mothers in need of family services and support, and to prepare students for primary school.

According to Safe Passage Executive Director, Trae Holland, this new nursery program is key as "it is important to intervene in a child's life, especially those who are living in a very traumatic environment such as our students."

Supporters were invited to a live event, showing the newly opened Guardería and existing Pre-K on August 12th. The event was hosted on the organization's blog at www.safepassage.org/blog.

Safe Passage was founded in 2000 by Maine native, Hanley Denning, who grew up in Yarmouth and attended Greely and Bowdoin. After traveling to Guatemala in the late 1990's to learn Spanish, she saw the plight of the hundreds of families living in and around the garbage dump in Guatemala City - among the largest in Central America - and decided to stay and help the children who worked with their parents scavenging the dump. What first started as a small drop-in center, eventually turned into a fully accredited school that serves pre-K through 9th grade and now includes nutrition, health care, literacy, college preparation, and job training, among other services, to over 600 students and their families in the Guatemala City garbage dump community.

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North Jackson Ag Meets At Pavelski's

Submitted by Julia Briechle

On Friday, July 22, the North Jackson Ag 4-H club held a meeting at the Pavelski farm. Jack Kowalewski started off the meeting and we talked about old business. We all did good selling ice cream for our fundraiser. Yesterday was one day camp held at the fairgrounds. There were so many cool things to do there. Everyone that attended talked about what they did. It seemed that the stained glass workshop was everyone's favorite!

Next, we discussed new business. The fair is quickly approaching and there are a lot of deadlines to pay attention to. Everyone was told to check their email and speak to a leader if there are any questions. Livestock kids were encouraged to continue finding livestock buyers. We moved on to demonstrations. Kaitlyn Supancik, Maria Klim, Ryan Supancik and Hunter and Austin Johnson all did demonstrations. Lastly, we finished with cookies, drinks and chips. The next meeting was August 9th at the new Susquehanna County Emergency Management Center.

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New Shoes And A Backpack Of Supplies

Submitted by Cindy Beeman

Can you remember when you picked out new shoes for school, and that felling of excitement that came with it? We all know that new shoes are a huge deal. Unfortunately, new shoes are a dream, not a reality for many kids in our community. Back to school shopping can add huge financial pressure on families and shoes don't always make the cut. But we can help.

This summer, just like past 20+ years Interfaith is helping kids get ready for the new school year, with new shoes and a backpack full of supplies. This year, as we have in the past, we are asking for companies, churches, groups and individuals to step up and fill in the gap for those families who cannot afford to buy new shoes or get a backpack full of supplies.

We understand how much harder it is to give with gas prices, the cost of food and the outlook for heating, but we believe Hebrews 13:16 which says "And don't forget to do good and to share with those in need. These are the sacrifices that please God." Your donation will shape lives, allowing children and teens to step back into the classroom with confidence.

We are expecting to help at least 511 children this year (that is how many have signed up as of right now), with another 50 on the waiting list. Our friends in Susquehanna are coming into the store August 11 & 12 to get their brand-new shoes, backpacks and supplies. Would you consider giving a gift to help buy the shoes, the backpacks and supplies? The children, parents and Interfaith are very grateful for any support you can give. Please send checks to our Montrose location: 526 Church Street, Montrose, PA 18801.

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Governor's Veto Marks A Sad Day

Sen. Gene Yaw (R-23) released the following statement after the governor vetoed legislation that would guarantee energy choice for all 13 million Pennsylvanians:

"Gov. Tom Wolf's baffling veto marks a sad day for Pennsylvania. Energy choice is about giving the power to consumers to decide what's best for them, especially when historic inflationary pressures and skyrocketing utility costs are already pushing many families to a breaking point.

"Pennsylvania is second in the nation for natural gas production and half of our residents can't access it. This state – yes, Pennsylvania – produces one third as much natural gas as the entire country of Russia. Unfortunately, the Wolf administration does not understand this or the relationship between energy, economy and environment. Most egregiously, this administration tells its citizens the government will make the energy choice for them. It is indeed a sad day for all of us.

"Whether the governor likes it or not, our energy policies over the last two decades, especially surrounding natural gas development, have resulted in lower electricity costs for our residents. So, it should be their choice, not his, as to whether they heat their homes with a gas furnace or an electric heat pump.

"Policies limiting the use of certain fuel sources only slows environmental progress and raises energy costs. This veto will hurt the most vulnerable among us the hardest at a time when they can least afford it."

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Yaw Recognized For Pro-Ag Policies

State Sen. Gene Yaw (R-23) landed a spot on the 2022 Pennsylvania Agriculture Power 100 for his legislative accomplishments focused on farmers and land conservation.

"Agriculture is intrinsic to Pennsylvania's economy and culture and I'm committed to prioritizing policies that grow the industry and preserve its legacy," Yaw said. "I'm honored to be recognized for these efforts and will continue to do my part to support Pennsylvania farmers."

City&State Pennsylvania published the list to highlight "the public officials, farmers, business executives, association heads, labor leaders, policymakers and others who shape the state's agricultural landscape."

Yaw recently championed passage of Pennsylvania's Clean Streams Fund, a program designed to remediate streams damaged by decades of non-point source pollution, including agricultural runoff, abandoned mine drainage and stormwater management in developed areas.

He also sponsored Act 83 of 2022 to mandate more responsible fertilizer use to improve water quality, diminish the growth of harmful algae that suffocates aquatic life and reduce water treatment costs for residents.

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PA Small Businesses Praise Court Ruling

In a critical blow to Gov. Tom Wolf's backdoor attempt to force Pennsylvania into the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) and levying a massive new energy tax, the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania this afternoon enjoined the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) from implementing, administering, or enforcing final rulemaking. The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB), the state and nation's leading small business association, has strongly opposed the Wolf Administration's unilateral and unconstitutional push.

"NFIB is thrilled the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania has granted a preliminary injunction to Governor Wolf's unconstitutional energy tax," said Greg Moreland, NFIB Pennsylvania State Director. "For years, our members have complained about rising energy costs, and with inflation at 8.6 percent, RGGI may have been the nail in the coffin for energy intensive small businesses. We hope the governor will come to the table and negotiate with the legislature, because we all want a clean environment. We just have different beliefs on how to achieve that goal."

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Susquehanna County Sentencing

Following are July, 2022 sentences as handed down by Susquehanna County Court.

Paige Lynn Scully, 31, of Montrose, PA to 3 years to 6 years in a state correctional facility, with credit for time served, pay a $500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $75 PA Department of Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, abide by the standard terms and conditions of the state parole board upon parole for Homicide by Vehicle while DUI on November 19, 2020 in Rush Township.

Ze Xun Mei, 64, of Elmhurst, NY to 9 months to 5 years in a state correctional facility, with credit for time served, pay a $1,000 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $100 Act 198 fee, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, submit a DNA sample and pay the $250 testing fee, abide by the standard terms and conditions of the state parole board upon parole for Criminal Conspiracy/Possession with Intent to Deliver on October 22, 2021 in Lenox Township.

Herbert E Roe, 46, of Montrose, PA to 6 months of probation, pay a $300 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $75 PA Department of Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, complete 10 hours of community service, continue with drug and alcohol treatment, complete the Alcohol Highway Safe Driving School Program, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, complete a CRN Evaluation, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Driving Under the Influence on January 2, 2022 in Liberty Township.

Todd Jason Rowles, 46, of Huntingdon, PA to 2 years to 7 years in a state correctional facility, pay a $500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, not to have contact with the victim in this case, submit a DNA sample and pay the $250 testing fee, abide by the standard terms and conditions of the state parole board upon parole for Obscene Materials on July 1, 2020 in Lenox Township.

Phillip J Peterson, 36, of Montrose, PA to 24 months of probation to run concurrent with his Wyoming County Sentence, pay $100 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, pay restitution to the victim in this case, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, be subject to random drug and alcohol screenings, perform 10 hours of community service, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Receiving Stolen Property on June 28, 2021 in Montrose Borough.

Christopher Moodie, 47, of Horseheads, NY to pay a $150 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $100 Act 198 fee for Possession of Drug Paraphernalia on June 20, 2021 in Great Bend Township.

William Barrett Wentworth, 30, of Waymart, PA to 6 months of probation, pay a $300 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $25 EMS fee, pay $75 PA Department of Transportation Trust fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, continue with drug and alcohol treatment, complete the Alcohol Highway Safe Driving School Program, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, be subject to random drug and alcohol screenings, complete a CRN Evaluation, perform 10 hours of community service, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Driving Under the Influence on July 4, 2021 in Lenox Township.

Dustin Greenfield, 26, of Hampstead, NC to 18 months of prosecution, pay a $200 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, submit a DNA sample and pay the $250 fee, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, be subject to random drug and alcohol screenings, perform 10 hours of community service, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Firearms Not to be Carried without a License on June 18, 2021 in New Milford Township.  Mr. Greenfield was also sentenced to pay a $50 fine, cost of prosecution and $100 under Act 198 for Possession of a Small Amount on June 18, 2021 in New Milford Township.

Emily Kathleen Lynn, 36, of Cinnaminson, NJ to 6 months of probation, pay a $300 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $25 EMS fee, pay $75 PA Department of Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, complete the Alcohol Highway Safe Driving School Program, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, be subject to random drug and alcohol screenings, complete a CRN evaluation, perform 10 hours of community service, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Driving Under the Influence on June 11, 2021 in New Milford Borough.

Laurale Tamara Harth, 29, of Union, SC to 12 months of probation, pay a $250 fine, pay cost of prosecution, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, be subject to random drug and alcohol screenings, perform 10 hours of community service, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for False Reports on August 17, 2021 in Forest Lake Township.

Christian A Caliente, 46, of Wyalusing PA to 3 days to 6 months in Susquehanna County Correctional Facility, pay a $1,000 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $25 to EMS, pay $75 PA Department of Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, complete the Alcohol Highway Safe Driving School Program, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, complete a CRN evaluation, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Driving Under the Influence on May 30, 2021 in New Milford Borough.

John Robert Shultz, III, 38, of Montrose, PA to 9 months to 23 months in Susquehanna County Correctional Facility, followed by 3 years of probation, supervision may be transferred to Luzerne County, pay a $500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $100 Act 198 fee, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, complete 50 hours of community service, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Contraband/Controlled Substance on March 27, 2021 in Bridgewater Township.

John F Baker, 50, of Thompson, PA to 6 months of probation, pay a $300 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $25 to EMS, pay $75 PA Department of Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, complete 10 hours of community service, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, complete the alcohol highway safe driving school program, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, complete a CRN evaluation, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Driving Under the Influence on December 18, 2021 in Susquehanna Borough.

Edward Robert Smith, 55, of Clifford Township, PA to 3 days to 6 months in Susquehanna County Correctional Facility, pay a $1,500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $25 EMS, pay $300 PA Department of Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, complete the alcohol highway safe driving school program, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, complete a CRN evaluation, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Driving Under the Influence on September 21, 2021 in Clifford Township.  Mr. Smith was also sentenced to 24 months of probation to run concurrent with the above sentence, pay a $500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol be subject to random drug and alcohol screenings, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Fleeing or Attempting to Elude a Police Officer on September 21, 2021 in Clifford Township. Mr. Smith was also sentenced to 5 years of probation, the first 9 months of which shall be served on home confinement, to run concurrent with the above sentences, pay a $1,500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $25 Ems, pay $150 PA Department of Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, complete the alcohol highway safe driving school program, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter establishments whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, receive a CRN evaluation, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Driving Under the Influence on May 25, 2021 in Lenox Township. Lastly, Mr. Smith was sentenced to 5 years of probation, the first 9 months of which shall be served on home confinement, to run concurrent with the above sentences, pay a $1,500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $25 EMS, pay $300 PA Department of transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, complete the alcohol highway safe driving school program, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, complete a CRN evaluation, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Driving Under the Influence on March 5, 2021 in Lenox Township.

Robert William Staff, 53, of Forest City, PA to 18 months to 5 years in a state correctional facility, pay a $1,500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $25 EMS, pay $150 PA Department of Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, be subject to DNA testing requirements for Driving Under the Influence on October 30, 2020 in Franklin Township. Mr. Smith also received 18 months to 5 years in a state correctional facility to run concurrent with the above sentence, pay a $1,500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $25 EMS, pay $300 PA Department of Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation for Driving Under the Influence on March 25, 2021 in Lenox Township. Lastly, Mr. Staff received 24 months to 5 years in a state correctional facility, to run concurrent with the above sentences, pay a $100 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation for Firearm Carried without a License on November 1, 2021 in Clifford Township.

Frank F Martinez, 32, of Bronx, NY to 2 years to 5 years in a state correctional facility, pay a $500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $100 Act 198 fee, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, submit a DNA sample and pay the $250 testing fee for Possession with Intent to Deliver on May 9, 2021 in New Milford Township.

Heather Marie Lewis, 32, of Susquehanna, PA to 18 months of probation, pay a $100 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, obtain a mental health evaluation, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Recklessly Endangering Another Person on August 7, 2021 in Oakland Borough. Ms. Lewis also received 18 months of probation to run concurrent with the above sentence, pay a $100 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, obtain a mental health evaluation, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Resisting Arrest on August 9, 2021 in Oakland Borough.

Brittany Faye Osborn, 26, of Hallstead, PA to 6 months of probation, the first 2 days of which shall be served on home confinement, pay a $500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $25 EMS, pay $75 PA Department of Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198, continue with drug and alcohol treatment, complete the alcohol highway safe driving school program, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, continue with mental health evaluations, complete a CRN Evaluation, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Driving Under the Influence on March 21, 2021 in Franklin Township.

Corey Mitchell Rogers, 25, of New Milford, PA to 6 months of probation, the first 3 days of which shall be served on home confinement, pay a $1,000 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $25 EMS, pay $75 PA Department of Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, complete 10 hours of community service, continue with drug and alcohol treatment, complete the alcohol highway safe driving school program, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, complete a CRN evaluation, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Driving Under the Influence on May 1, 2021 in Great Bend Township. Mr. Rogers also received 5 years of probation, the first 90 days of which shall be served on home confinement, to run concurrent with the above sentence, pay a $1,500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $25 EMS, pay $150 PA Department of Transportation, pay $100 Act 198 fee, complete 10 hours of community service, continue with drug and alcohol treatment, complete the alcohol highway safe driving school program, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, complete a CRN evaluation, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Driving Under the Influence on August 10, 2021 in New Milford Township.

Keith Lewis Edwards, Jr, 43, of Montrose, PA to 6 months to 23 months in Susquehanna County Correctional Facility, pay a $100 fine, pay cost prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, obtain a mental health evaluation, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Obstructing Government Function on December 31, 2020 in New Milford Township. Mr. Edwards also received 6 months to 23 months in Susquehanna County Correctional Facility to run concurrent with the above sentence, pay a $500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, obtain a mental health evaluation, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Fleeing or Attempting to Elude a Police Officer on February 20, 2021 in New Milford Borough.

Ronald Lee Degraw, 60 of Great Bend PA to 12 months of probation, pay a $100 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $100 Act 198 fee, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Possession of a Controlled Substance on August 1, 2021 in Great Bend Township. Mr. Degraw also received 2 years of probation to run concurrent with the above sentence, pay a $100 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, submit a DNA sample and pay the $250 testing fee, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Endangering the Welfare of a Child on August 1, 201 in Great Bend Township.

Jett D Callahan, 60, of Great Bend, PA to 6 months of probation, pay a $300 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $25 EMS, pay $75 PA Department of Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198, complete 10 hours of community service, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, complete the alcohol highway safe driving school program, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, complete a CRN evaluation, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Driving Under the Influence on October 17, 2021 in Oakland Township.

Robert Thomas Cowan, 70, of Montrose, PA to 11 ½ months to 23 ½ months in Susquehanna County Correctional Facility, pay a $100 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, obtain a mental health evaluation, not to have contact with anyone on supervision, not to possess firearms, not to have contact with persons under the age of 18, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Failure to Register on June 19, 2021 in New Milford Township.

Dawn Schwarztrauber, 30, of Springville, PA to 6 months of probation, pay a $300 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $25 EMS, pay $75 PA Department of Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, complete 10 hours of community service, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, complete the Alcohol Highway Safe Driving School Program, not to utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose primary purpose is the sale of alcohol, submit to random drug and alcohol screenings, complete a CRN evaluation, abide by the standard terms and conditions of supervision for Driving Under the Influence on May 14, 2021 in Franklin Township.

The following were accepted into the Accelerated Rehabilitative Disposition Program: Jeremy Cole Miller, John Nicholas Balducci, Bradley Clifford Compton, Diane Pierce, Bertha J Fisher, Tyler Lee Knapp, Walter Ordonez, Brett Benner, Connor John Roberts, Nicholas John Brajuka, Robert William Fleming, Colleen Walker, Anthony Michael Whitney.

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Courthouse Report

The Susquehanna County DOMESTIC RELATIONS Section has outstanding BENCH WARRANTS for the following individuals as of 8:21am on August 12, 2022. Jackie J. Bean, Lee M. Carter, Kara A. Cosgrove, Benjamin D. Fassett, Charles R. Groover, Charles J. Korzeniowski, Veronica Mitchell, Danielle Norris, Chad Schurr. Please contact the Domestic Relations Section at 570-278-4600 ext. 4050 with any information on the location of these individuals.

DEEDS as of 08-17-22

Canfield, Eloise (AKA) and Canfield, Eloise J and Grippen, Carol (AKA) and Grippen, Carol M to Canfield, Eloise for $1.00 in Gibson Township.

Canfield, Eloise (AKA) and Canfield, Eloise J to Canfield, John D for $1.00 in Gibson Township.

Canfield, George A (AKA) and Canfield, George and Canfield, Eloise (AKA) and Canfield, Eloise J to Canfield, John D for $1.00 in Gibson Township.

Short, Jennifer to Short, Jennifer for $1.00 in Silver Lake Township.

Bean, Jackie Jo to Perkins, Tyler for $207,500.00 in Liberty Township.

Wert, Robert C and Collins, Linda M to Chocolates By Leopold Inc for $165,000.00 in Montrose 2W.

Stockholm, Harold E and Stockholm, Barbara A to Schroeder, Jonathan for $150,000.00 in Gibson Township.

Novak, Barbara J and Novak, Alexander James to Carlton, Ronald E Jr and Carlton, Beth E for $170,000.00 in Forest Lake Township.

Turner, Robert J and Turner, Karen Kielty to Turner, Jerilee N for $1.00 in Herrick Township.

Mineral, Oil and Gas Rights: Sturgeon, Joseph (AKA) and Sturgeon, Joseph A to Sturgeon, Joseph and Sturgeon, Brian for $1.00 in Great Bend Township.

Schake, Maureen to Schake, Jay and Schake, Nicole for $250,000.00 in Rush Township.

Gage, Kevin M (Estate) to Gage, Amanda S and Gage, Sidney A for $1.00 in Rush Township.

Wood, Thomas R and Spellman, Tracy L to Wood, Thomas R and Spellman, Tracy L for $1.00 in Great Bend Township.

Hermann, Erwin (Estate) to Allen, Glendora R for $1.00 in Great Bend Township.

Mervine, Dawn (AKA) and Lee, Dawn to Blue Shield Enterprises LLC for $40,000.00 in Great Bend Township.

Allen, Glendora R and Hermann, Erwin (Estate) and Battaglini, Linda to Battaglini, Linda for $1.00 in Jackson Township.

Yankauskas, Frank and Yankauskas, Elizabeth K to A&F Property Holdings LP for $45,000.00 in Forest City 2W.

Ellis, Jeffrey S to Dafcik, Joseph Richard for $325,000.00 in Springville Township.

Hess, Maetta F (AKA) and Hess, Maetta to Beers, Raymond Samuel and Beers, Wanda Diane for $85,000.00 in Choconut Township.

McInerney, Phyllis (By Atty AKA) and Taylor, Phyllis (By Atty) to AMJ Cottrell Trust for $300,000.00 in Clifford Township.

Fanelli, Ronald and Fanelli, Ronald Jr to Fanelli, Ronald Jr for $1.00 in Uniondale Borough.

Florance, Johnnie A and Florance, Marsha D to Florance, Johnnie A (Trust) and Florance, Marsha D (Trust) for $1.00 in New Milford Township.

Florance, Johnnie A and Florance, Marsha D to Florance, Johnnie A (Trust) and Florance, Marsha D (Trust) for $1.00 in New Milford Township.

Demchak, Joseph P and Demchak, Billie S to Joseph and Billie Demchak Family Trust for $1.00 in Auburn Township.

Demchak, Joseph P and Demchak, Billie S to Joseph and Billie Demchak Family Trust for $1.00 in Auburn Township.

Sterling, Janet E and Sterling, Charles W and Sterling, Michelle J to Sterling, Michelle J and Garner, Jimmy A Jr for $1.00 in Bridgewater Township.

Sterling, Janet E and Sterling, Charles W and Sterling, Michelle J to Sterling, Charles W and Sterling, Deborah Ann for $1.00 in Bridgewater Township.

Mancuso, Michael and Mancuso, Jennifer to Katchmore, Jonathan and Katchmore, Heather for $8,000.00 in Herrick Township.

Baier, Jonathan J to Renault, George and Frey, Amanda for $239,900.00 in Silver Lake Township.

Green, Mildred G to WLR Family Limited Partnership for $280,000.00 in Dimock Township.

Caines, Thomas J Sr to Caines, Victor V and Caines, Michelle M for $1.00 in Springville Township.

Brainard, Frank and Brainard, John to Brainard, Frank and Brainard, John and Brainard, Brittany and Brainard, Cole and Brainard, Taylor for $1.00 in Gibson Township.

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