County Living

HomeCounty Living ( November 20, 2019 )

Christian Academy Receives Donation

Faith Mountain Christian Academy recently received a generous donation of five turkeys from Susquehanna County Commissioner Alan M. Hall. Students from the school, alongside of First Baptist Church of New Milford, have organized a Thanksgiving Food Drive to help needy families in the New Milford community.

If anyone would like to donate, please feel free to drop off non-perishable items during school hours. Thank you to all those who have supported our students through their donations to this drive.

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East Ararat UMC Honors Veterans

Submitted by Jackie Price

On behalf of area Veterans, the East Ararat United Methodist Church held a free luncheon on November 10, 2019 to honor them. Pictured are a few of the great men that joined us this year. We have been doing this for the last 6 years and can not wait to do it again. Each year we reach new men and women who have served our country. We are blessed by these wonderful Veterans who serve our country for our Freedom.

God bless them all.

 

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Forest City ALC Takes A Day Trip

Submitted by Kelly Hall, Community Services Coordinator

Participants and volunteers of the Forest City Active Living Center made a day trip to Ladore Campground on September 19. The group first convened in the dining room for a light breakfast before deciding on the day's activities, which included hiking trails, card tournaments, miniature golf, yoga, swimming, and a trolley ride tour. After a delicious lunch, the group enjoyed a scenic boat ride touring the grounds and learning about the Native American history and culture of the property from a friendly tour guide. Lastly, a few members of the group participated in the campgrounds auction, while some lounged by the indoor pool, and others simply relaxed outside in the beautiful weather.

All agreed that the fresh air and beautiful scenery at the Ladore Campground made for a wonderful day trip, and the group certainly plans to visit again in the future. The Forest City Active Living Center thanks the staff of the Ladore Campground for a wonderful time.

The Forest City Active Living Center, located at 535 Main Street in Forest City, invites adults 60 and over to stop by for food, friends, and fun Monday through Friday from 9:00am to 2:00pm. For more information about the Forest City Active Living Center and its activities, please call 570-785-3386.

The B/S/S/T Area Agency on Aging, Inc. is funded in part by the Pennsylvania Department of Aging; the United Way of Bradford County; the Lycoming County United Way serving Wellsboro and southern Tioga County; the United Way of Susquehanna County and the Bradford, Sullivan, Susquehanna and Tioga County Commissioners. For additional information on Area Agency on Aging services, please call 1-800-982-4346.

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Giving Thanks To Our Fresh Air Families

This holiday season, we thank families in Northeastern Pennsylvania for opening their hearts and home to Fresh Air children. Each summer, thousands of children from New York City's low-income communities visit suburban, rural and small town communities along the East Coast and Southern Canada through The Fresh Air Fund's Friendly Towns Program. By volunteering as a host family for Summer, 2020, the joy of the holidays can continue in your home throughout the year.

"My father-in-law was a Fresh Air child, and I thought this would be a good way to give back," says Pamela Rivera, of Garden City, NY, and Fresh Air Fund host mother of six years. "When Kyle and Abena visit, we go to the pool, the beach, and camping. Each year when they come back, it feels like old friends getting back together."

Fresh Air children are boys and girls who live in New York City. Children who are reinvited by host families may continue with The Fresh Air Fund through age 18 and can enjoy extended trips. Volunteer host families frequently share how they rediscover the beauty of their own communities through the eyes of Fresh Air children.

The Fresh Air Fund, an independent, not-for-profit agency, has provided free summer experiences to more than 1.8 million New York City children from low-income communities since 1877. Each summer, thousands of children visit volunteer host families along the East Coast and Southern Canada and at The Fund's six overnight camps in upstate New York. Fresh Air children also participate in year-round leadership and educational programs.

Please contact Kavita Shah at 212-897-8970 or visit www.FreshAir.org to learn more about hosting a child through The Fresh Air Fund.

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NJD BPW Has Very Busy October

Submitted by Jenny Bixby

Nellie Jane Dewitt BPW had a very busy month in October.

We celebrated the Business Woman's Week, Oct. 21-27, 2019. Mary Mushala, Vice-President was presented by the County Commissioners a Proclamation from Governor Tom Wolf. The Governor, in this Proclamation would encourage all citizens to recognize and celebrate the achievements of working women as they contribute daily to our economic, civic and culture livelihood.

 

Pictured (l-r) are: Nellie Jane Dewitt BPW President Linda Bedford, District Eight Director Amanda Collier, Host Carolyn Bartczak

At our regular meeting on October 24, 2019 hosted by member Carolyn Bartczak, District Eight Director Amanda Collier came for a visit. She discussed what being a Business and Professional Woman club member means to her and each of us.

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UWSC Hosts Raise the Bar

Submitted by Kim Merithew

On a beautiful fall evening, United Way of Susquehanna County (UWSC) kicked off its annual campaign on Wednesday, September 25th at Chet's Place with its Raise the Bar celebrity bartender event. Our hosts, Jean and Mark and their staff, put on a wonderful event, and our celebrity bartenders did an outstanding job serving up fun and signature drinks to the many who turned out to support UWSC.

Congratulations to Tammy Bonnice from Williams as she was this year's winner of the celebrity bartender competition raising the most in tips with all proceeds going to support United Way.

Many thanks to all of our fantastic celebrity bartenders: Tammy Bonnice-Williams; Marsha Morrison, NBT Bank; Staci Wilson, Susquehanna County Independent and Weekender; Kyle Herbert, New Milford Hardware; Lynn Conrad, D&H Rail Trail; and Bill Lopatofsky, Lopatofsky Auction, LLC. Special thanks to staff bartender and United Way allocation volunteer Cassidy Robinson for helping our bartenders out.

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UWSC Receives Grant For Nurse's Pantry

Submitted by Kim Merithew

United Way of Susquehanna County (UWSC) is proud to announce its partnership with AllOne Charities to fund the school-based Nurse's Pantry program in Susquehanna County. The Nurse's Pantry provides school nurses with funding for essential items for students whose families may not be able to afford and can result in those children missing valuable class time.

The Nurse's Pantry was piloted in 2018 in the Susquehanna Community School District and has now been introduced to all school districts in Susquehanna County with a goal of reducing chronic absenteeism among at risk children in our community.

"If children miss school, they can't learn, grow, and succeed," said Bill Jones, CEO of United Way of Susquehanna County. "Students in need often miss valuable school time because they don't have appropriate school clothes, hygiene products or other basic needs. The Nurse's Pantry will provide those items and keep children in the classroom and learning, which then gives them a better chance of success in school and in life."

United Way of Susquehanna County was recently awarded a $5,000 grant from AllOne Charities, which allowed The Nurse's Pantry to be expanded to the Blue Ridge, Elk Lake, Mountain View, Montrose Area, and Forest City Regional School Districts in addition to Susquehanna Community School District. Approximately 4,700 students will now have support from The Nurse's Pantry.

"AllOne Charities invests in solution-based programs that are innovative, creative and collaborative to improve the health and welfare of the people of Northeastern and North Central Pennsylvania," said John Cosgrove, Executive Director, AllOne Foundation. "United Way of Susquehanna County's Nurse's Pantry was one of twelve selected of 66 applicants for AllOne Charities funding. Supporting the simple concept of providing school nurses, who have frequent contact with at risk children, with the basics to keep students in class and learning truly made sense, and we thought it was important for AllOne Charities to be part of this initiative."

The Nurse's Pantry offers supplies including lice kits, clothing (socks, shoes, undergarments, shirts, pants, hats, gloves, coats), and hygiene products as well as the resources to obtain items like prescription eyeglasses, School nurses can immediately address unique student needs and solve problems resulting in a reduction in absenteeism and parents missing work.

United Way and AllOne Charities believe this program will be well received and will support families who are unable to cover unexpected, unbudgeted costs and will help children stay on track academically. To learn more about United Way of Susquehanna County visit www.unitedwayofsusquehannaconunty.org; and AllOne Charities at: https://allonefoundations.org/charities/.

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Holiday Gifts For Gardeners

Submitted by Melinda Myers

Holidays are a wonderful time to gather with friends and family, share a special meal and exchange gifts. Finding the perfect gift for those we love can be overwhelming and stressful. No need to fret; give the gift of gardening that provides seasons of joy.

It doesn't matter if your recipient is young or old, new or experienced, an avid gardener or one who just likes the benefits gardening provides. You can find something special for everyone on your gift list.

Small and large space gardeners will appreciate help keeping their tools handy as they work their way through their landscape. Give them a bucket, pair of gloves and a few tools to keep by the door for those quick planting, weeding and deadheading sessions. Or decorate an old mailbox and turn it into tool storage to be mounted in the garden. Their tools will be handy and they'll spend less time and fewer steps hunting down forgotten tools.

Or purchase a tool caddy. Look for one that's colorful and waterproof like the Puddle-Proof Tote that holds and keeps hand tools, gloves and seeds dry. Help them wrangle larger tools for easy transport from the shed to the garden and from bed to bed with a wheeled tool caddy that handles larger tools. The Mobile Tool storage caddy (gardeners.com) has pockets for small tools, secures large handled tools and provides a place to hold compost, cut flowers or vegetables. It's easy to maneuver, eliminates multiple trips to the shed and is perfect for gardeners of all ages and abilities.

Tools are always a favorite of gardeners. Newbies need to build their tool collection while experienced gardeners may need to replace broken or time worn hand tools. Consider giving a harvest basket, bucket or tool caddy filled with some basics. All gardeners will appreciate a new innovative tool that makes gardening easier or more fun. Look for ergonomic tools that are built to ease stress on joints and allow gardeners to work longer with less pain. Multifunctioning tools like the Golden Gark Rake that rakes, scoops and sifts helps save storage space and the need to haul around multiple tools.

Help your favorite gardener keep their green thumb in shape all winter long. Provide them with pretty pots, potting mix and seeds. Look for kits like the Galvanized Organic Kitchen Herbs Growing Kit that provides all they'll need to grow their own fresh herbs. Increase their indoor gardening success with supplemental lighting. You'll now find light stands that sit on the table, mount on the wall or attach to plant pots. Furniture quality Bamboo Mini LED Grow Light systems provide energy efficient lighting in a set up pretty enough for any room.

And for those that like the flowers but have limited time or interest in growing, give them a waxed amaryllis bulb. They won't need to water or fertilize. Beginning and experienced gardeners will watch in amazement as this plant bursts into bloom with no effort on their part.

Don't know what to send? Cut flowers, flowering bulbs and plants are sure to generate a smile in just seconds. Take care of special occasions throughout the year in one single order. Place one order for 3, 6, or 12 months of blooming beauty delivered right to your loved one's door, providing joy throughout the year.

So, break out your gift list and look for ways to give the gift of gardening. Your family and friends will appreciate your thoughtfulness all year long.

EDITOR'S NOTE: Melinda Myers has written more than 20 gardening books, including Small Space Gardening. She hosts The Great Courses "How to Grow Anything" DVD series and the Melinda's Garden Moment TV & radio segments. Myers is a columnist and contributing editor for Birds & Blooms magazine and was commissioned by Gardeners Supply for her expertise to write this article. Her web site is www.MelindaMyers.com.

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PA Is At Top Of New Lyme Disease Cases

Submitted by Colleen Schake, Lyme Disease Coalition, Inc.

As you should know, PA is once again on the top of the list reporting new cases of Lyme disease.

Over eleven thousand, nine hundred new cases of just Lyme disease were reported in 2017. The CDC estimates these numbers to be ten times what is being recorded.

We agree the numbers are not accurately reflected since Susquehanna County only shows 129 on the CDC reports. When we polled local facilities in August of 2017 there were well over 400 reported to the CDC and the fall incidence were not included in our numbers. Apparently, all the reported cases were not included in the CDC numbers or did not fit their criteria.

Criteria needs to change.

PA Lyme disease task force, born from Act 83 of 2014, came out with recommendations in a report issued in 2015. In 2018, Governor Wolf proposes funding to combat Lyme disease and in 2019 passes a budget that includes Lyme disease along with other vector-borne diseases that are to coincide with suggestions from the report issued four years earlier.

During those four years, studies from several of the state universities have been released raising new concerns which should change the scope of funding to be more diversified to include patient care as well as vector control.

Reports need updating much faster and funding needs to be more diversified.

Following as a brief overview of what has happened since the 2015 release of the state recommendations.

ESU published a report finding other pathogens in the larva tick which we had once believed did not carry pathogens. These new pathogens are not being tested in humans and could be part of the reason persistent infections continue. Funding was issued to ESU for FREE tick testing to further these studies, but nothing changed for the patients suffering from Lyme and possible other tick-borne diseases.

PSU also released another article indicating the years they have been studying ticks, the types, and the pathogens they carry, which also reported new species of ticks not previously under scrutiny.

Drexel University concludes their tick collection to help identify ticks and the pathogens they may transmit using comprehensive high-resolution testing able to detect all bacteria inside of ticks – not just Lyme disease and the pathogens we already know. Results from this have not yet been published.

BU, our northern neighbor also has been studying ticks, human behavior, and now has started a Lyme patient-centered "Lyme and Other Tick-borne Disease Research Center" with goals of research discovery, risk assessment, optimization of treatment and management, and public health intervention and prevention. They are currently hosting a patient bio-bank for urine and serum samples to be used in studies, as well as a community tick drag surveillance study targeting residential areas.

Johns Hopkins, another neighboring state, has released several publications providing evidence of persistent or chronic Lyme bacterial infection, which has been the source of much debate whether it is a persistent infection or just lingering symptoms left after treatment, which they call Post Lyme Disease Syndrome. Patients finally have validation of Persistent Lyme Disease. Another study, just recently published for the treatment of patients with a cocktail of three antibiotics used for therapy, clears the infection in mice and now needs approval and funding to start human trials.

Other areas of positive results are with vector control.

The use of 4 poster stations, bait boxes, tick tubes and sprays to name a few, have also been studied and reported to show effectiveness.

In 2017, a report was published by Schulze TL, et al. J Med Entomol, with findings from a NJ study, another of our neighboring states. This study showed bait boxes and tick tubes used for vector control, with 87.9% and 97.3% control of host-seeking nymphs in treatment sites.

Another study published by Dolan MC, et al. J Med Entomol. 2017, shows the effectiveness of vector vaccine being used to stop the transmission of the bacteria being passed on with effectiveness of 61 – 96% reduction in small mammals and pathogens. Other studies showed similar results.

As you can see, funding has been directed to ticks and the study of migration, pathogens and species, which needs to continue with new pathogens and species being found consistently, however, funding also needs to be much more diversified. Funding needs to include not only surveillance of the vectors but also human studies, education for behavioral changes, education for physicians to clinically diagnose patients due to a lack of good reliable human testing, as well as vector control management to help prevent the spread of further disease.

With the release of funding from our state going mainly to education and surveillance, more can be done at savings to the taxpayers.

In 2018, PA Lyme received funding for an educational prevention program, which targets groups with information on how to help prevent tick bites, later to have the funding for the delivery of the presentations cut due to a conflict in CDC criteria. When the CDC utilizes old, outdated information supplied mainly through the IDSA, we need to back education that supports updated information that can be substantiated in a much faster fashion.

Other groups have submitted educational opportunities for a younger age group and told by the PA DOH that they were working with PA Lyme.

Again, a more diversified approach needs implementing so that the work done is not repeated, taken advantage of, and delivered in a timely manner.

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Pickett Announces Safe Schools Grants

Four area school districts were awarded Safe Schools Targeted Grants to improve safety and security measures, according to Rep. Tina Pickett (R-Bradford/Sullivan/Susquehanna).

"The safety of our children in the classroom is one of the Legislature's top priorities," said Pickett. "These grants will help to ensure that schools are providing a secure learning environment for students, as well as the faculty and staff."

The following school districts in the 110th Legislative District were awarded funding:

  • Elk Lake – $30,580 school resource officer program grant.
  • Northeast Bradford – $24,300 equipment program grant and $20,000 safety program grant.
  • Sayre Area – $18,954.74 safety program grant.
  • Wyalusing Area – $25,000 equipment program grant and $19,999.80 safety program grant.

School resource officer (SRO) grants fund programs which address school violence by establishing or enhancing school security, including costs associated with the training and compensation of SROs.

Equipment grants can be used to purchase security-related equipment including student, staff and visitor identification systems; metal detectors; protective lighting; surveillance equipment; special emergency communications equipment; electronic locksets; deadbolts and theft control devices; and training in the use of the security-related technology.

Safety program grants assist school entities by providing funding for programs that address school violence.

The Safe Schools Targeted Grant Program is administered by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and funded by the General Assembly in the 2019-20 state budget. A total of $7.2 million in grant funding was awarded to schools statewide.

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Susquehanna County Sentencing

Following are October, 2019 sentences as handed down by Susquehanna County Court.

Joseph P. Smith, 29, of Nicholson, PA to 12 months of probation, pay a $500 fine, pay cost of prosecution for Harassment on July 14, 2018 in New Milford Township.

Gerald David Hine, Jr, 33, of Jackson, PA to 12 months of probation, pay a $100 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, perform 10 hours of community service for Hindering Apprehension on November 16, 2018 in Jackson Township.

Jason Robert Eromenok, 42, of Susquehanna, PA to 30 days to 6 months in Susquehanna county Correctional Facility, pay a $750 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $100 Act 198 fee, pay $150 PA Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $10 Ems, complete a CRN evaluation within 30 days, continue with drug and alcohol treatment, perform 10 hours of community service for Driving Under the Influence on April 24, 2017 in Harmony Township.

Garry P Wilber, 62, of Great Bend, PA to 12 months of probation, pay a $100 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, perform 25 hours of community service for Theft by Deception on August 1, 2014 in Lanesboro Borough.

Kevin David Miles, 25, of Apalachin, NY to 6 months of probation, pay a $100 fine, pay cost of prosecution, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation for Disorderly Conduct on October 5, 2018 in Springville Township.

Sean Michael Quinn, 36, of Denville, NJ to 2 days to 6 months of home confinement, pay a $500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $100 Act 198 fee, pay $75 PA Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $10 EMS, pay restitution to the victim in this case, complete an alcohol highway safe driving school program, perform 25 hours of community service for Driving Under the Influence on June 29, 2019 in Gibson Township. Mr. Quinn was also sentenced to 18 months of probation to run concurrent to the above sentence, pay a $200 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, not to utilize any alcoholic beverages while on supervision, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, be subject to random drug and alcohol screenings, perform 25 hours of community service for Recklessly Endangering Another Person on June 29, 2019 in Gibson Township.

Daniel Kellogg-Nelson, 22, of Kingston, NY to 12 months of probation, pay a $200 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, not to have contact with the victim in this case, perform 25 hours of community service for Unauthorized Use of an Automobile on August 16, 2019 in Liberty Township.

Corin Royale Olshan, 27, of Laceyville, PA to 3 months to 3 years in a state correctional facility to run concurrent with the sentence currently being served out of Wyoming County as well as each sentence out of Susquehanna County, pay $100 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, pay restitution to the victim in this case, not to possess transport or consume alcoholic beverages and/or controlled substances while on supervision without a valid medical prescription, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, perform 10 hours of community service, be subject to random drug and alcohol screenings for Theft by Unlawful Taking on November 19, 2018 in Auburn Township. Ms. Olshan also received 3 months to 3 years in a state correctional facility to run concurrent with the sentence currently being served out of Wyoming County as well as each sentence out of Susquehanna County, pay a $100 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, pay restitution to the victim in this case, not to transport consume or possess alcoholic beverages and/or controlled substances while on supervision without a valid medication prescription, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, perform 10 hours of community service, be subject to random drug and alcohol screenings, for Theft by Unlawful Taking on September 6, 2018 in Forest Lake Township. Finally, Ms. Olshan received 3 months to 3 years in a state correctional facility to run concurrent with the sentence currently being served out of Wyoming County as well as each sentence out of Susquehanna County, pay a $100 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, pay restitution to the victim in this case, not to possess transport or consume alcoholic beverages and/or controlled substances while on supervision without a valid medical prescription, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, perform 10 hours of community service, be subject to random drug and alcohol screenings for Theft by Unlawful Taking on September 18, 2017 in Auburn Township.

Fernando R Rivera, 54, of Forest City, PA to 24 months of probation, pay a $250 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enforcement Act fee, pay restitution, not to possess any weapons while under any period of supervision, obtain a mental health evaluation, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, not to have contact with the victim in this case for Criminal Mischief on May 22, 2019 in Forest City Borough.

Wesley Allen Morton, 63, of Scottville, MI to 30 days home confinement under the Susquehanna County SCRAM Bracelet Program, followed by 5 months of probation, pay a $750 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $150 PA Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, pay $10 EMS, complete an alcohol highway safe driving school program, not to possess transport or consume alcoholic beverages while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose principle purpose is the sale of alcoholic beverages, perform 25 hours of community service for Driving Under the Influence on October 14, 2018 in Lenox Township.

James A Thomen, 67, of Montrose, PA to 12 months of probation, pay a $300 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, not to utilize alcohol while on supervision, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, not to enter any establishment whose principle purpose is the sale of alcohol, perform 10 hours of community service for Recklessly Endangering Another Person on January 30, 2019 in Montrose Borough.

Cody Patrick Church, 29, of New Milford, PA to 9 months to 23 months in Susquehanna County Correctional Facility followed by 2 years of probation, pay a $250 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, pay restitution to the victim in this case, not to have contact with the victim in this case, not to have contact with anyone on supervision, not to possess or consume alcoholic beverages or controlled substances while on supervision, be subject to DNA testing requirements and pay the $25 DNA testing fee, be subject to random drug and alcohol screenings, not to possess firearms, perform 10 hours of community service for Receiving Stolen Property on August 8, 2018 in New Milford Township.

Justin Alexander Johnson, 27, of Hallstead, PA to 6 months of probation, pay a $300 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $100 Act 198 fee, pay $75 PA Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $10 EMS, complete the alcohol highway safe driving school program, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, not to utilize any controlled substances or alcohol beverages while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose principle purpose is the sale of alcohol, perform 10 hours of community service for Driving Under the Influence on December 6, 2017 in Susquehanna Borough.

John Edward Clink, Jr, 29, of Hallstead, PA to 3 months to 23 months in Susquehanna County Correctional Facility, pay a $250 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, not to possess any weapons while on supervision, continue with drug and alcohol treatment, not to possess or utilize alcohol or controlled substances while on supervision, be subject to random drug and alcohol screenings, not to enter any establishment whose principle purpose is the sale of alcohol, write a letter of apology to the victim in this case, not to have contact with the victim in this case, perform 25 hours of community service for Terroristic Threats on July 5, 2018 in Great Bend Township. Mr. Clink also received 3 months to 23 months in Susquehanna County Correctional Facility to run concurrent to the above sentence, pay a $250 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, continue with drug and alcohol treatment, not to possess any alcoholic beverages, not to enter any establishment whose principle purpose is the sale of alcoholic beverages, not to have contact with anyone on supervision, write a letter of apology to the victim in this case, not to have contact with the victim or his family, not to possess weapons while on supervision, perform 25 hours of community service for Terroristic Threats on July 13, 2018 in Great Bend Township.

Billie Jo Warner, 39, of Susquehanna, PA to 70 days in Susquehanna County Correctional Facility, followed by 5 years intensive probation, with a specific condition that the defendant attend inpatient treatment, pay a $250 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $50 Criminal Justice Enhancement Act fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, be subject to DNA testing requirements and pay the $250 fee, not to have contact with anyone on supervision, not to utilize alcoholic beverages or controlled substances while on supervision, not to enter any establishment whose principle purpose is the sale of alcoholic beverages for Possession with Intent to Deliver on June 21, 2019 in Great Bend Township.

Scott Sylvester Obelenus, 48, of Forest City, PA to 90 days home confinement, subject to the Susquehanna County SCRAM bracelet program, followed by 4 years and 9 months of probation, pay a $1,500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $150 PA Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, pay $10 EMS, not to utilize alcohol while on supervision, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, continue with mental health therapy, not to possess any firearms while on supervision, complete an alcohol highway safe driving school program, perform 10 hours of community service for Driving Under the Influence on September 3, 2018 in Forest City Borough. Mr. Obelenus also received 12 months of probation to run concurrent with the above sentence, pay a $500 fine, pay cost of prosecution, not to have contact with the victim in this case, obtain a mental health evaluation, not to utilize any alcoholic beverages or controlled substances, perform 10 hours of community service for Simple Assault on September 19, 2018 in Forest City Borough.

Cary Gene Tidwell, 55, of Scranton, PA to 5 days home confinement under the Susquehanna County SCRAM Bracelet Program, followed by 5 months of probation, pay a $300 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $150 PA Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198 fee, pay $10 EMS, complete an Alcohol Highway Safe Driving School Program, obtain a drug and alcohol evaluation, not to possess transport or consume alcoholic beverages, not to enter any establishment whose principle purpose is the sale of alcohol, perform 10 hours of community service for Driving Under the Influence on July 5, 2019 in Clifford Township.

Robert Gene Nielsen, Jr, 50, of Thompson, PA to 6 months of probation, pay a $300 fine, pay cost of prosecution, pay $75 PA Transportation Trust Fund fee, pay $100 Act 198, pay $10 EMS, complete the Alcohol Highway Safe Driving School Program, receive a drug and alcohol evaluation, not to possess transport or consume alcoholic beverages, not to enter any establishment whose principle purpose is the sale of alcohol, perform 10 hours of community service for Driving Under the Influence on April 12, 2018 in Lanesboro Borough.

The following were accepted into the Accelerated Rehabilitative Disposition Program: Ben Patrick Welch, Benjamin Lee Barber, Kevin M Bebla, Logan Koulter Gellman, Jill Lafera, Justin Matthew Silfee, Dylan Jeffrey Whipple, Jennifer Osterhout, Jason Robert Coon.

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Pet of the Week

Submitted by True Friends Animal Welfare Center, 16332 SR 706, Montrose, PA 18801. Phone 570-278-1228 Website: truefriendsawc.com

This calm, mild mannered gent is Pirate. He is an excellent snuggler when required and is content to be in the company of humans. His shiny coat and deep green eyes add to this "Purr"fect kitty package. Pirate is UTD, neutered, Fiv/FeLV negative and ready to move right in to celebrate the holidays. So if you are seeking a friendly feline who is low maintenance and highly lovable, please come meet this handsome fellow and give him the best times of his life.

Don't forget, all our cats are presently only $10 in hopes of making room for more needy cats.

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